HHF Interview: HooNoz

Interviewed by Big Momma ‘Miz’
In this interview, Chicago-based MC HooNoz talks about his motivations for keeping on with his music, what he thinks is behind the excess of so-called trash music these days and his role in the Harvey Finch movement.

HooNoz

HHF’s correspondent, Miz answered the phone with a greeted melody “HOONOZ” similar to the way Ice Cube says “WEST SIDE” …

Yes, Ma’am” says HooNoz in a bass tone, Chicago accent.

HHF: How was ya day, how was the video shoot?

HooNoz: Actually it got cancelled, there’s a heat advisory going on, it’s been hitting over 100 degrees.

HHF: Tell me a little bit about the song and video.

HooNoz: My music is what I like to refer to as reality music, some Joe Average human being trying to get through their struggle it’s called the ‘Best I Can Be’, I’ve been getting a lot of feedback, online radio stations been pickin’ it up and spinning it, I’ve been trying to do a video for it for the last year and a half, it took a while find a location.

HHF: What was special bout that particular spot that you finally chose, did it correlate with the video, did it enhance the message in ‘Best I Can Be’?

HooNoz: I appreciate the architecture of what it is, it’s a very old cemetery that closed down, after the owner passed, his wife built a big wall around his grave stone, on top of a hill, it’ll have a real nice look on the backdrop of the video I think.

HHF: From flipping around on your website http://www.hfemovement.com I can see that style in Harvey Finch’s dark music, what’s the album going to be called?

HooNoz: Reloaded, for several reasons, I kinda toyed with my style for a few years, slowed down my lyrics and it was like the game kept slowing down, it’s almost like chopped and screwed and on drugs. It’s my first full length album that will be released since my company got digital distribution, and it’s also my tenth solo project released.

HHF: Tenth?

HooNoz: Tenth, yes ma’am, my 9th solo project drops the same day, it’s a mixtape, and the album comes out on the same day, so that’ll be my 9 & 10 projects, to date I got 10 videos released off the mixtape, and 8 off of the album …  

HHF: What’s the motivation behind all of that?

HooNoz: Honestly my passion for music, I’m motivated because it’s hard to find good hip hop.

HHF: What do you think is the cause for some artists that don’t push it to their full potential?

HooNoz: In my opinion I see it as categories, you got rappers and then you got artists, rappers they rap cause they think it’s cool, some of them actually can, some just do it because everybody else does, and if it doesn’t blow overnight like they thought it would, they start bs’n.

HHF: Regardless of not getting that instant fame, would you always encourage artists to keep on pushing no matter what?

HooNoz: You never know when things can work out for you through your passions, if you got a passion for it you should do it, but I also believe this game ain’t for everybody.

HHF: What do you think of the state of hip hop and rap now, where do you feel like Hoonoz fits in? I like a few club bangers, but I can’t call myself a fan of it, I can’t grasp anything from today’s music that works for me, what about you?

HooNoz: (in a sincere tone) When I promote my music, you’re the kinda person I look for, I don’t try to fit in with what’s going on, the hip hop on a major platform is very lights, camera, action, Hollywood entertained, scripted like wrestling, it’s like the state of hip hop is messed up, the majors lyrically are the minors and the underground is where you’ll find real the music, real fans, I’m trying to give the real listeners good music, and it’s hard, because it’s so much not good music out here.

HHF: How do you connect to or find your target audiences that you want to relate to, since the emphasis are on the lack of a better word, trash music?  

HooNoz: Aside from being in the street and word of mouth, the Internet.  I’m not a big fan of the Internet, but it definitely finds those people, every time they share it, I know people from where they are from are seeing what I’m doing too, and it may never pay off financially, but if my time was over tomorrow I had an opportunity to do what I love to do, it’s like you live forever, as long as the Internet don’t shut down and people can still pull up ya music, 10 years later you’re still here, you left something.

HHF: I was listening to a podcast the other day about the type of music taking over and flooding do you think this wave of music will die and the styles of Nas and Ghostface will be in the mainstream again, or will it stay underground?

HooNoz: Call me conspiracy theorist, this is probably one of the reasons I may never see major status, there’s a lot going on behind closed doors… ’bout 20 years ago they seen the pride that hip hop gave people of a struggle..you know ‘Keep Ya Head Up’ – we come from nothing which makes us stronger, we survive, we progress and embrace that struggle, don’t shame yaself like society does, hip hop gave us an inner strength at one point, I feel like the powers that be, the one that pull the strings, they’re the ones putting all this BS into the game, so it’s hard for me to say we’ll ever see the good hip hop at an amazing level, in hip hop’s messages, no matter how negative it came off, it almost always had a positive energy to it.

HHF: I agree, I was showing my kids a few videos, ‘Brenda Had a Baby’ being one of them, and the messages that they portrayed and when we rapped along, we were saying something.

HooNoz: (He interrupts with an apology, I encourage him to proceed) I just wanna say two things real quick that relate to that, people have to learn you are what you eat, that is mentally and physically, it almost seems cool to be uneducated today.. and second of all … Damn I lost my train of thought already, that quick …

HHF: Don’t dwell on it, it’ll come back when you’re not thinking about it, so let’s keep talking … Switching subjects, one song I liked was called ‘Other Zones’ do you want to speak on that, what influenced it?

HooNoz: When I wrote ‘Other Zones’ the lean was becoming real popular, so I figured I’d make something pertaining to it, that joint was produced by Johnny Julianni, he become popular during Wiz Khalifa’s rise, he was one of his main producers. I leased a beat from him, and when I sent him back the song he actually liked it, and told me he was gonna give me exclusives to it.”

HooNoz- Other Zones on SoundCloud

HHF: I forget the name of the song, but in a verse I heard you say ‘some say I sound like Pac’ – do you remember what song that was?

HooNoz: Yeah, I love that song, and to be honest, I’m not a big fan of my own music because I hear a lot of my flaws in it, that actually is one of my favorite songs, and the song, ‘Everywhere You Turn’ I had built a bond with the production team from Germany, and they were helping my get songs on the radio there, people were saying, I listen to your music, I hear more reality in it, you’re not rapping bout the bullshit rims, and the big booty girls at the strip club, or the kilos that you never sold, I hear real struggle, I hear pain, I hear realness in the music, and a lot of people were saying that it reminds them of 2pac.

HHF: I was wondering if it was intentional to sound like him or you feel like you share the same spirit and it flowed naturally?

HooNoz: I grew up to Pac & Biggie, I was lucky enough to see (I hate to say it) the demands of hip hop to know that what’s portrayed in hip hop’s society today, is not real hip hop,…Ohhh, that’s what I was gonna say, You were right, we continue talking and I would remember it.

HHF: Yup!

HooNoz: (he continues) It’s hard right now to name five popular rappers in the game that was in the game 10-15 years ago, music has become so trashy that you get your moment and then you’re gone, The music isn’t everlasting anymore, just momentary trash.

HHF: In your opinion, why is that?

HooNoz: Well, it goes back to my conspiracies, the guy that owns MTV, CBS, BET, the white man who brought it from him, even Bob Barker, who is a huge investor of the prison system, that takes me back to … take the positive message out the music and feed them negativity, a lot of these major record labels are also prime investors of the American prison system, and it’s not just music, they do it through the movies and video games, they constantly feed aggression and violence and ignorance to the youth, You might hear me talk about violence in my music, and the artists that I associate with, but it’s because we came from it, there’s nothing cool about killing another poor person from your broke ass community, because you think they got more than you do.

HHF: Right, I understand that.

HooNoz: I’m blessed, I usually try to tell these younger dudes, I know they keep telling you that you gonna die or go to jail before you’re 25, but truth be told, a lot of people wake up at 30, and they’re not dead, so what are you gonna do with a Tech 9 and a promethazine bottle tattooed on the side of ya face at 30 years old?

HHF: Yeah, good message. Ok, but before we’re done, I want to shed a little light on the Finch Mob, the whole Harvey Finch movement, I want you to say a little about that, what is the Finch Mob?

HooNoz: The whole company is owned by Harvey Finch, and the goal from the beginning was always independence, showing that we can do what the majors do, we can purchase, film, record, and release our own. Before a project drops we put like 6,7,8 music videos out, prior to promoting it. I can’t say you’re gonna drink the water, but I know when we get done, you’re gonna leave with enough water that you can bottle it and sell it”

HHF: Yeah I hear that, so you guys must have a dynamic team over there.

HooNoz: We get that a lot, but to be honest with you, it’s mostly just me and my wife, she seen my vision, she got behind it, learned everything she could to keep everything moving, it’s 10 of us working, but it’s two of us physically.

HHF: I’m gonna wrap it up, any last words, motto or a message that you want to say that reps you and what you stand for?

HooNoz: Yes, I just want to say, people need to stop saying hip hop is dead, it’s alive and well and producing some of its best music in the underground, you have to give unknown artists a listen. Just because a person is mainstream doesn’t mean they aren’t trash.  If you say hip hop is dead and you don’t support or listen to unsigned artist, then YOU are what’s killing hip hop, get off the band wagon, and follow your own ears. If you are not part of the solution, then you are part of the problem.

HooNoz

 

Big Momma “Miz” a North Philly native, out of Harrisburg PA., She is now the representative/manager for an indie label ILL CRE (Illustrious Creations of Entertainment). Hip Hop culture is embedded in her style & personality; she likes to compare her persona to Shock G & Humpty Hump”, meaning its two sides to the coin. Big Momma Miz handles the biz, while Penelope handles the mic!

Miz

Miz is part of the New Black Writers Program, managed by Hip Hop Forum Digital Magazine, to support, nurture and develop the talents of Black American journalists of the future.

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