HHF Report: Raising the bar/What you know about Barfest

Written by Nobodee Jones

I always speak to the artistry of hip hop music. Real rap that pulls at a cat’s mind with entangled metaphors and words grounded in veracity that either leave a cat sayin’ shiiid or damn. It’s that much mo’ important as we in a time when tunes like this aren’t heard in the culture (on mainstream, but what’s new?)

That ish is a testament to the need to refocus on the roots and get back to the essence of hip hop, the underground. I chopped it up with one such cat that embodies this drive, mindset, work ethic, and fellowship that the culture has lost in it pursuits of fame, money, marketability, and chasing that tabby and then check this! Yea this cat can rhyme!

What you folks know about Diggz a.k.a Diggz the Prophecy?  It’s the bullishery going on now in the culture that got some folks looking for deep ish in the dark but its cats like Diggz that stoke the fire for the culture and helps bring real hip hop out the depths back to its proper position. This 27-year-old Jersey cat. Hood raised mind elevated. Says he been rhyming since like 11 years old.

Pulling inspiration from various artist. Diggz –  “Main one is basically Nas but I’m influenced by anyone that picks up the mic and chases the dream because its hard as fuck to get into, especially now days where; it’s oversaturated nowadays. Talent really doesn’t matter nowadays it’s all about image and all other stupid sh!t, but that’s another topic.

If I had to go with main influences Nas, Pac, Biggie, even people like Cassidy, Lord Banks I mean I got a different set of inspirations and influences depending on what we talking about but the main influence is definitely Nas.”  (Sidebar: Diggz is an artist is his rite but he run rhymes with a clique of other lyrical beast in AClass Company, S/O)  

 

But we on that Barfest, right?  Diggz is the architect, he started this ish on some never forgot the lessons, chances, and opps he had in life (despite doing a lot on his lonely). So he took a local idea some time back (bout a year), gave it the Diggz and BARFEST was born.  

First jumping off a year ago and it was well received with 16 enter with one cat walking away, that being Walter the West Nile (bullishin’ it’s just Walter West, but he sick).  Only 2 and a half judges that first year, that half in case a tie. This year just got underway and although it’s now a closed set and cats are locked in the prelims this year where around 55 folks and 5 judges now!   Yet it’s not done with just rappers, we got producers in on this as well, even though the focus it bars.

“I also let the producers drop whatever beat they want, like I said because even though this competition is mostly for artist. I wanted some producers who normally don’t get people to check out there beats to get some recognition.” – Diggz.  

So this competition has the rawr heartbeat in it. We all love a good beat but that whole concept is subjective to the cat listening to it (kind of a deep area, perception). The thing is so many hip hop heads or those that claim that title overlook the underground scene and it’s now more assessable than ever. (Sidebar: Why you think this bullish they call rap is so easy to get nowadays) Yet if a cats work ain’t heard on the radio you deny credibility or you either given credit where it isn’t due.  

Barfest is Hip Hop, it just brings those cornerstone park and rec battles to everyone with www access.

Diggz – “Anybody who follows me, follows my circle of friends, that may have reposted when I made the announcement or post. If you want to join, go ahead, I don’t have to know you personally. It’s like what yall do on Rawr Radio, if you feel as though you need the platform to showcase what I call “The Bars” then join. It’s for the artist, it’s not for my artist or my friend it’s for THE artist; anybody who feels as though they slept on, I’m underrated. Well join and prove yourself.”

Barfest 2 is already running with the preliminaries over and the tourney underway starting with 16 cats. Vespa, Hero, Shara, Asce, Seis, Manga D, Neb, Peace, Jools, Detox, Sax, Shogun, La Dub Z, Maikis, Jason, and Gatzby who can all be found online via SoundCloud.

(Sidebar: Whatever you do, you do it Rawr and if I didn’t address this, a cat wouldn’t be doing it in the Rawrligion Way. I thru a shout to AClass Company earlier, these cats are Diggz Da prophecy, LA Dub Z, Walter West, WarrenPeace, Nosticthepoet, & Magnetic The Shaman.)

If you notice or know Diggz is the architect and one of the judges, as well as Walter West and, Nosticthepoet and two of the cats in the comp are in his group. In fact, this is what Diggz had to say about that.

“The bad thing about have three judges in AClass. Everybody thinks we going to be bias against the members. I tell people all the time, if LA and Peace come weak they would hear it from me first because they in the group. I would have said no offense but yall might night make the next round.

“Like they would get the judging even more because they in my group. I’m not bias at all If they win, blame yourself. You didn’t muthaf#ckin out bar them. It’s not my fault that yours, I’m not like everybody else I don’t pick friends over who is actually good. Yall got me f#cked up if think that’s what I do.” -Diggz. Gotta luv that and the smooth ish about it, he answered that with us just chopping it up.

Check it you can find Diggz Da Prophecy on SoundCloud and YouTube and you can follower the Barfest 2 on his SoundCloud page as well. On another note RAWR Radio will also be doing a special ShowCast when the Barfest is all said and done. The broadcast will cover/highlight the event! Date and times are still on the table so stay posted and stay RAWR!!

Nobodee Jones, co-owner, online broadcaster, personality for RAWR Radio based in Ardmore, Ok. Born in Ardmore, OK raised in Atlanta, GA. Pays homage to hip hop culture through RAWR Radio Weekend ShowCast via Mixlr.com online. RAWR Radio itself grew from a personal need that mainstream hip-hop is failing to produce. Although still in the early stages the shows continue to see growth. We feature Unsigned Underground artist. Real radio, just like you like your Hip-Hop! From the heart but not for the overly sensitive. Check out the RAWR Radio website and stay connected with Nobodee Jones and RAWR Radio on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, SoundCloud, Google+. RAWR!

 

HHF Opinion: Manslaughter; We have a charge, will there be a conviction? 

Written by: Warnell Jones

Call me crazy, but I think I just witnessed America showing some form of guilt and remorse. I may be losing it, but did the mighty US of A take action against a white police officer for the unjust murder of a black man?

 

Perhaps good old America is coming to its senses, realizing that it’s not (never, ever was) acceptable for police officers to use deadly force against situations that don’t call for such. We hope that someone in our judicial system came to see this (and every instance like it) for what it is – a crime.

 

Allow me to catch you up on current events.

 

Terance Crutcher

On September 16, 2016, in Tulsa, OK, Officer Betty Shelby killed Terence Crutcher – an unarmed; or otherwise innocent, black man – after shortly being tazed by her fellow officer during a traffic incident. She later gave the press the excuse of Crutcher not following orders and possibly reaching through a closed window for a weapon (that was never in the vehicle). Now generally, these claims are coerced and allowed as fact in these cases. However, multiple videos of the incident have made this case different.

 

Betty Shelby

On September 22, 2016, Officer Shelby was charged with Felony 1st Degree Manslaughter – punishable up to life in prison.

 

This is an anomaly in modern-day American society – history tells us that no matter the offense, the powers-that-be (the judges, in this case) choose the side of the lawman against the side of the victims. So often, the officers that commit these crimes are sent on paid leave, while the system “investigates”, only to determine that the officers in question will not have charges brought against them.

 

In 2014, 100 unarmed black men & women were killed by police, notably including young Tamir Rice & Michael Brown. No convictions of murder or manslaughter for any officers.

 

In 2015, 102 unarmed black men & women were slain by police, notably Sandra Bland while in police custody. Of those cases, 2 convictions of manslaughter were found.

 

This year, the names range from Alton Sterling to Philando Castile, from Korryn Gaines to Keith Lamont Scott. Now Terence Crutcher. This is the 1st charge for manslaughter this year. That staggering statistic means that if the police have a similar number of unarmed killings this year, and Officer Shelby is the only officer convicted this year, the rate would be 1%. Over 3 years, 300 unarmed people killed by police, 3 convictions.  3 / 300 = 1%.

 

Certainly, in an America where “all men are created equal”, that idea doesn’t fare well for anyone in possession of melanin-heavy skin.

 

Perhaps I am somewhat elated to see that black people of America are getting a chance of an apology, of recognition, of acceptance.

 

But then again, history shows me different. That 1% number only happens if a conviction is handed to Officer Shelby. Right now, she’s only been charged……

 

…….and we know a charge and a conviction are two different things.


Source of statistics: http://www.mappingpoliceviolence.org. 


HHF Report: Hip Hop Festivals (September, 2016)

Written by Vince Comegys-Davis

Dear Hip Hop,

While you are a part of our everyday lives, it has been a while since we have had a conversation. From the beginning you have been a best friend to many, touched the souls of the world and have helped us through tough times. You have evolved with every new generation and with each one that has taken the torch to pass on your knowledge it has been said that a piece of you has disappeared.

As it is now there is fear that you have already been laid to rest. It was with a heavy heart that these words touched my conscious and I could not help but wonder how it is that this culture that has impacted the world in so many ways has ended. Was it all cleverly laid plans to further alienate a people? If that is the case then we must raise a fist in the air for those who take up arms through hip hop to pass on the knowledge of the past to future generations. So as it is believed that the human spirit does not perish, so too is it that the spirit of hip hop does not fall. Which then begs the question, why is it that we continually hear that hip hop has died? Is it because we are being force fed a watered down version of what hip hop once was? If so, where have you been old friend?

*Pause*

In fact, your essence has been felt. No, not so much because of the mainstream but because of the underground. Through events and organizations that understand the culture and wish to share it with their communities. Allow me to share that information with those who may be reading this ode to you.

In 1973 (as the story goes) Kool DJ Herc was playing at a party and found a way to extend the break beat of songs. There were good vibes throughout these parties and they brought together communities. This is where hip hop, the music aspect, began and it is still alive in the world today at events throughout the world.

If you wish to be a part of hip hop in its purest form, why not check out these events this month in Philadelphia, California and Baltimore …

 

  1. Allentown Arts Festival

Presented by The Alternative Art Gallery

September 30-October 2, 2016

Allentown, PA

www.allentownartsfest.com

 

  1. Meeting Of Styles

September 16-18

San Francisco, CA

http://www.meetingofstyles.com

 

  1. Skillz Over Politicz

Johns Hopkins University

September 10

Baltimore, MD

http://www.skillzoverpoliticz.eventbrite.com

 

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Born and raised in the city of Wilmington, DE. Like many other inner city youth hip hop was a major form of self expression, but Vince Comegys-Davis took a different route into the culture. Beginning in musical theater and training in the classical styles, it didn’t take for him to realize that his first love was for the dance element of the culture. Since 2007 Vince has been passing on the knowledge that has been bequeathed to him and it was this mindset that brought forth the creation of Street Xpressions Arts Organization.  A nonprofit organization in which he is the Executive Director. It is here that Vince, his board and the teachers will continue to pass on the history of the culture.  Vince is part of the New Black Writers Program, managed by Hip Hop Forum Digital Magazine, to support, nurture and develop the talents of Black American journalists of the future.

HHF Opinion: New Rap Style (if you call it that!)?

Written by Nobodee Jones

The death of the lyricist Is a reality that has the nerve of hip hop heads and hip hop culture irked. The cats that laid this ish down, right? See this is where my opinion may clash with some. It could also be that I may need to be enlighten on the culture perhaps. A cat ain’t above learning or derailing my own ignorance. Yet if I gather this ish right hip hop’s cultural music, rap didn’t start in the conscious mind of correcting the ills and “keep it real” philosophies or the tight quips and spit of the world or by shining lights on the black and grey matters of Ghetto and Po’ville, USA. In fact, it was more like to get your mind off the bullish and f*ckery that every town and country had burdened my folks with. True dat a cat was not immersed in the era that birthed the culture, so all this is a second hand account of his story. Yet I recall the talks from older cats of days when it was a delight to hear raps from the gang in sugar hill. The artistry that made flash a grandmaster, and the how Flex mastered the funk. [On another note: My thought actually reflects back to the tales of DJ’s mastering the breakbeats and looping. Giving cats ammo to bust out backflips, backspins, windmills, and robotic moves.] But when cats started rapping It felt more braggadocious and to keep the party live.

Now we fast forward to the hip hop scene today. True, a cat really isn’t into a lot of the music getting built up or pumped by mainstream and media so much. A lot of these cats just saying box ‘cause it rhyme with socks and they ride the rhyming to deliver bull-ish glazed over with a “catchy hook” Now, the question is this. Isn’t this just party music, turn up tunes, or get lit hits, whatever you want to call it? Ok, now they even got the culture throwed. The whole wardrobe is some bull-ish. The technicality of making tights out of jean material got these cats on some real Gangstalicious ish. But here’s another throwback thought tho. Remember the era of disco or what I call that “purple era” with Prince, Morris Day, and cats like them. Know what I’m talking about? That time when these cats was dressing up in spandex and frills and wearing make -up and all other androgynous tomfoolery (not the word I wanted take out fool and at sex act + ery)? Sometimes this ish seems like a cycle and you get a certain type a cat that gets in touch with his inner bird and then call that shit fly. Just saying, these cats aren’t too different than those cats.

Back on the point tho. Trap music and trap beats aren’t the death of hip hop lyricism. Those beats don’t determine the course of the culture. In fact, the music is significant in showing growth of the culture in the creation of another subgenre of sound. The issue is that some of these new cats don’t give a ish as long as they get the fame and the money.  Check this, I don’t force my kids to listen to any genre. What appeals to the soul can’t be told but if they want to know what hip hop is, I school em.   (i.e. Hustle, & Lil DJ.)These kittens now a days don’t know the history and at this point, it probably wouldn’t matter if they did. Not as long as the standard for a successful track is a tight beat and a nice hook. {sidebar: Oh this is what happens when industry comes into play. If you lower the bar for acceptable work, let’s say lyricism, you then increase the abundance of lyricist. We all love a good beat. So get a neck dancer track, make that head sway. So now the paradigm shifts to DJ’s & producers cause you can throw bull-ish on it and it still jam.  Recall the verse in planet rock, we still jammed and sang along with that za za za…just sayin’) Maybe its growing pains of the culture? You know that time when you woke up and had head full of white head embarrassment spread across ya face. So here’s one perspective; these kittens mumbling on the mic with their generic bars and flamboyant presentation of themselves cannot kill lyricism in the game. It’s true that if you dub it Hip-Hop or rap music it’s a bit offensive how I see it. Its like taking the art form backwards an that’s the ish that gets under the skin.  This is why you gotta  keep ya ears open for  cats like Prynce Tone, Southside Louie, J. Israel, Diggz Da Prophecy & La Dub Z,  The culture is amidst an industrial hostile takeover and these little cats do not know or care they pawns, they out for they scratch.

Mic Check – The Idiocy of Mumble Rappers | EP.02ble Rap…

This is the direction of mainstream. It’s a money game. The standard has been lowered and they undermining the worth and skill of a lyricist.  Got these kittens treating the lyrics like an accompaniment instrument. This is an offense to the Hip-Hop Culture.  Its nonsensical verbal upchucks and folks confusing the smell of this as real shit cause they throw in references to the life of struggle and hustle in that word vomit. Nothing like songs by artist like  King Cobb, Banner, Flame Da Darkchild , & Ratt Boi, Mainstream don’t play them but play that bullish and you know what happens if you hear the same tune over and over, regardless if you hate it. You gone find yourself humming or singing it.  Not knocking these kids hustle, neva that. They only PROVE the need for RAWR Radio, and that cats we spin; D-Dot Jewels, Tha Message, M.O.D tha Hardhead, Kelly Machete, & Dre K.B along with the great avenues for artist and hip hop culture like Big B Show, Hip-Hop Forum, Cro Audio-& Video Studios, and Labels like CTOWN  Records, MilliUp, Open Window Ent., Over the Top Ent., and  GamFamTV.

 

James “Nobodee Jones” Horton, co-owner, online broadcaster, personality for RAWR Radio based in Ardmore, Ok. Born in Ardmore, OK raised in Atlanta, GA. Pays homage to hip hop culture through RAWR Radio weekend Show cast via Mixlr.com online. RAWR Radio itself grew from a personal need that mainstream hip-hop is failing to produce. Although still in the early stages the shows continue to see growth. We feature Unsigned Underground artist. Real radio, just like you like your Hip-Hop! From the heart but not for the overly sensitive. Check out the RAWR website and stay connected with Nobodee Jones and RAWR Radio on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter,Soundcloud,Google+. RAWR! 

HHF Interview: Ajawavi Ajavon, ‘Every Man Counts’

Written and interviewed by Warnell Jones

If you’ve been paying attention to life over the last thirty years or so, you’d come to notice that the fabric of the traditional family has been tearing away ever so steadily. Now, that doesn’t mean that single parent homes cannot work, but rather that the optimal situation of two-parent homes seems to be fading away.

In many cases, fathers are not an equal part of their children’s lives – sometimes, even dictated by the judicial system to be this way. Many single mothers have taken the task of attempting to be both mother and father because there was no proper resolution to the relationship, nor proper mediation within. It is an issue within our society that has changed the “norm” when it comes to family.

In the wake of her own family troubles, Ajawavi Ajavon found a true calling in the field of family re-attachment – focusing on FATHERS. Her company, DAB Mediation, has spawned an organization called Every Man Counts. It’s through this organization that she, along with others, have created hope and confidence for men in the areas of child support, co-parenting, and relationship mediation.

EveryManCounts

HHF: Thank you so much for taking sometime today to talk to us about your great organization, Every Man Counts. How did this awesome thing get started?

Ajawavi Ajavon: Ok. Every Man Counts started from my own personal experience. I was married for eighteen years, and when I filed for separation, my ex-husband separated from not only me, but also our children. I saw my kids go through heartache, and now I had to take on the role of being “mom” and “dad”. I was the “den mother”, the “cub scout mother”, the “girl scout mother”, and the “basketball mom” – I had to split myself three ways, one for each of my kids; one a cheerleader, one a basketball player, and one a Cub Scout. I saw that they appreciated what I did – sometimes they didn’t want to make me go out of my way to do things, but I enjoyed it – but I could still tell they missed that “father figure” in their lives.

So, I started working with my ex-husband to help him understand how important it is to be in the children’s lives; not only as married, but especially when we separated. I didn’t want him to take out his frustration against me on the children. He’s still coming around – it’s a work in progress. The kids are 24, 21, and 15 – they were 15, 12, and six when we separated.

I was a certified mediator for the courts in Delaware and New Jersey, and I seen that so many people would come into court unprepared. Same as my ex-husband, when I took him to court for child support, he was dumbfounded, like, “What? Why do you need child support?” So, I took my experience, and what I would want for my children, and created Every Man Counts. I knew it was important to educate the fathers. Through my experience with my ex-husband, I had something to teach the fathers, so other mothers wouldn’t have to go through what I went through. I’ve noticed it’s not just in our community – it’s in every male community, black, white, Asian, Hispanic. Every Man Counts, because when we build better dads, we build better lives.

HHF: What type of things do you do in this organization?

Ajawavi Ajavon: I educate fathers, from the early stages – changing diapers, breast milk feeding – all the way to the adolescent stages – what to talk about with your daughter during her first menstrual cycle, and her first boyfriend. Some of these things I help educate fathers on because I know fathers that are afraid to talk about these necessary subjects.

We hold lots of workshops. Financial literacy, entrepreneurship, activity ideas for the fathers who have their kids in joint custody, healthy food choices, co-parenting. We also have a program for those that need assistance with re-entry, and those needing assistance with court proceedings. It’s called CourtSmart. In addition to our workshops, we have events to promote unity, and it also gives the men in our program a chance to commune and share their experiences. I was actually purchasing trophies for our annual Dads fishing trip. This year is our third.

We invite fathers and sons, but I also invite children who don’t have a father or a mentor, and give these men the opportunity to be a part of their lives. We even did a Father-Daughter Tea Party, where we had fathers and their daughters come and participate in a dressy tea party event. We had girls aged all the way up to 16. It was sold out. So beautiful. We also have an event called the Barbershop Conversations, where we actually go to a barbershop and have open conversation about the issues pertinent to the community.

HHF: How do your clients initially react to a black woman making such a grand effort to help fathers?

Ajawavi Ajavon: At first, they’re like, “OK, she’s a woman. What does she know about fathers?” (Laughs) I stress that I don’t teach fathers how to be fathers. What I do is teach fathers what mothers and children need and want from an absent father. I’m not gonna teach you how to pull your pants up and be a man, no. I’m teaching the basics of being the better dad for the child. And what is special about my program is that the fathers that have been through my program come back and become teachers and presenters in the program – they give back by mentoring other fathers. Financial Literacy, Entrepreneurship, all taught by our own fathers. The only classes I teach are the early stages parenting and the co-parenting classes. The fathers love to encourage each other, “I’m a single father just like you – if I can do it, you can do it.”

HHF: What is the most common problem that you come into contact with in your clientele?

Ajawavi Ajavon: The common issue I have with clients is that they’re not confident enough. They’re not confident enough that they can win their case. They’re not confident of the judicial system. They often have a view that the court is “for the women”. It’s hard but necessary to change this mindset. The core values of my program are integrity, perseverance, accountability, and discipline. I can’t service anyone that isn’t able to adhere to these core values. I don’t allow my clients to play victims. We must be accountable for the portions of this situation which we are at fault. I can’t hold your hand. I can help you, but I can’t do it for you. In our CourtSmart program, we show these guys how to have all paperwork prepared, signed, stamped, dated, and arm them with the confidence backed by our core values, not only are they empowered to do well in court cases, the judicial system often shows respect and favor for their efforts. In fact, the courts refer clients to us because we teach the specifics that the courts want to see – at a cheaper price and more efficiently than many lawyers in these areas.

HHF: This is clearly a needed program across the nation. What is your current jurisdiction? What are your future goals?

Ajawavi Ajavon: We are currently in four states – Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Maryland. I could see this everywhere. I want to take my company to every city. I want to get government-funded. Right now, we exist from private donations, along with efforts from my for-profit company, DAB Mediation.

HHF: Thank you so much for this time! We are looking forward to your program spreading like wildfire through the nation!

Ajawavi Ajavon: Thank you so much!

Aja

DAB
Warnell Jones has always been a writer at heart. He often writes about music, love, and society (in no particular order). He is a part of the New Black Writers Program, managed by Hip Hop Forum Digital Magazine, to support, nurture and develop the talents of Black American journalists of the future.

HHF News: School Boy, Rich Homie Quan on VH1, spotlight on new talent – Azeem and Carlos St John

Written by Danny Deserve

 

Boss Lady: You’re late with your column what the hell is going on?

Me: I’m sick ….. (sips Henny)

Boss Lady: What is it, the flu, a virus did you get meds?

Me: I’m sick of all these senseless murders (sips more Henny)

Boss Lady: Are you drinking?

Me: Never mind all that …. Black Lives Matter Goddamn it!!!

Boss Lady: You’re fired F*ck this sh*t…..*

Me: Damn shorty….. (sips Henny)

What’s popping good people it’s your boy Danny Deserve aka Book em Dano, aka Padre Nuestro, aka Black Sinatra, aka Bub from the Bronx. I’m back to serve you up with what’s hot right now so pour some Henny and let’s get it.

 

Check out the sophomore release by School Boy “Q” “Black Face”.  

It’s been a hot minute since School Boy has taken the time to bless us with his dopeness and he didn’t let us down one bit with his sophomore LP titled “Black Face”. He killed with his sure to be single “Whateva U Want” feat. Candice Pillay, who has written for the likes of Christina Aguilera, Rita Ora and Sevyn Streeter.  She sings in the background like she’s haunting this joint, fans of Swedish Group Little Dragon will appreciate her vocals. The Dogg Pound joins in and adds some West Coast funkadelic type flavor on “Big Body” where he rides the groove and you can almost visualize him executing a two-step west coast shuffle. Additional tracks laced by the like of Miguel (which is one for the lady’s), Jadakiss, E-40 and Vince Staples makes this album a must blaze. Knocking all 17 of these tracks will definitely restore your faith in the new era of Hip Hop.

SQB-Disk-_-Cover-Mockup_v2_large

 

Rich Homie Quan VH1 Hip Hop Honors

Give him a pass…

Nah son, never

On everything, what this cat did during that tribute was totally disrespectful to BIGGIE. That being said my boys from New York were about to start a Gofundme page to take son out. How the hell are you going to get on a tribute show and not remember BIG’s lyrics?!!!!! For real son, you and cats like Trinidad James, Designer and Young Thug (OMFG) are what is wrong with Hip Hop today.  If I were you I would cancel all shows in New York City area until the hate dies down, let’s say a year sh*t maybe two… Then the youngster issued an apology, brother let me tell you no one and I mean no one holds a grudge like a New York cat…..two words “witness protection”.

Rich Homie Quan Apology

Here are two new artists on the rise (I feel like I owe the Boss) Azeem feat Carlos St John “Hurricanes and Tornadoes”

This duo sets this track on fire

Here is two more by the cocky young Carlos St John …..

Bang out people……until next time stay safe people it’s real in the field.
DannyDeserve

Danny Deserve was born in Harlem but raised in the Bronx, New York City where he watched the evolution of Hip Hop culture. His believes that the culture transcends race and religion and prior to the message being hijacked, was a primary force in bring people around the world together in harmony. 

Check out his FB page, Save Hip Hop Boycott Hot 97.1

 

HHF News: Logic, Joe Budden/Drake, spotlight on new talent: Young M.A

Written by Danny Deserve

 

Boss Lady: I need you to start this weekend

Me: You mean like 4th of July weekend?

Boss Lady: Yes, can you get it done?

Me: F*** my life, are you serious?   I guess I better put this Hennessey Down……. #hennygang

Salutations good people, allow me to introduce myself my name is…………… Hov!!!!  Not really its Danny Deserve and welcome to my rap editorial.  I know, I know how many writers have their own rap column?  Plenty, but how many do you know grew up in the birth place of Hip Hop, the Bronx, New York?   I guess you can say I’ve been around the rap game for a minute.  How many do you know went to hip hop jams in Echo park, Crotona Park and watched legends DJ or sat in high school science class with Sonny Cheeba of Camp Lo fame?  I didn’t think so, I speak and write in New York vernacular so please forgive me…. let’s get down to business shall we?

Check out the surprise release by Logic titled Bobby Tarantino.  

Out of nowhere, Logic decides to drop off a surprise album and believe me he shows up and delivers with dope beats and a flow that rides every beat like a melodic monk.  Blessing us with 11 tracks in total, the follow up to his sophomore album, The Incredible True Story, comes with a lone feature from Pusha T on the previously released banger “Wrist.” In addition, the project also contains the record “Super Mario World,” were he serves up a dope flow and a banging hook, easily my favorite cut on this album.  This was a quick blessing from Logic but if It’s any indication of his upcoming album, another concept album, I’m all in stay tuned people.

Bobby Tarantino on Apple Music

Bobby Tarantino on Spotify

Joe Budden “Making a Murder (Part 1) “

Next up I would like to address the Joe Budden diss track titled “Making a Murder (Part 1)” where he systematically assaulted and executed Canada’s very own favorite emcee Drake. You have to firstly step back and brush up on your subliminal rap game before you can fully understand the magnitude of this spanking. Joe Budden took Drake to task over some comments Drake made on his “4 am in Calabass” track, where he picked out the subliminal shots Drake took at him and Sean Combs (Puffy) within the lyrics. Joe Budden is a certified spitter of serious bars, no vocals with a degree in word-play that has known to go over the average listener’s head, true rap veteran. Drake on the other hand, is what’s hot and is not a push over but with all of his mainstream hits, and radio friendly flow he’s left his audience wondering can he weather this storm……. we shall see.

Joe Budden- “Making a Murderer (Part 1)”

Here is a new artist on the rise, Young M.A “Oh My Gawdd” (Freestyle Video)

The young up and coming rapper hasn’t just hit the scene but is still relatively new, tell me what you think.

 

 

Well this raps up my first column I hope I was able to touch you wherever you are and bring some of this fire to your corner of the world. Be easy and walk good ……until next time Danny Deserve signing off…

DannyDeserve

Danny Deserve was born in Harlem but raised in the Bronx, New York City where he watched the evolution of Hip Hop culture. He believes that the culture transcends race and religion and prior to the message being hijacked, was a primary force in bring people around the world together in harmony.

Check out his FB page, Save Hip Hop Boycott Hot 97.1